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PCOM Center for Brief Therapy - Pre-Doctoral Intership Program in Clinical Psychology 2009-2010

  

A Commitment to Training
PCOM Center for Brief Therapy
The Pre-doctoral Internship at The Center for Brief Therapy
Stipend
Pre-doctoral Internship Goals
Internship Activities
     Clinical Problems
     Collaboration with Primary Care Physicians
     Consultation Services
     Psychological Testing and Assessment
     Teaching
     Supervision
     Administration
     Research
Didactic Training
Intern Evaluation
Grievance Procedure
Due Process Procedure 
Application Requirements
About PCOM
Training and Supervising Faculty
References

 

A Commitment to Training

Value 1: We are committed to a practitioner-scholar model of training, particularly the "local clinical scientist" model.  Training is based on bringing scientific knowledge and scholarly practice to clinical work.  Interns are encouraged to base their interventions on both the broad research literature, and upon locally derived scientific observations.

Value 2: We are committed to a broad range of skill development encompassing a variety of skill sets that are useful to practitioner-scholars.  Training provides a broad range of experiences aimed at producing well-rounded clinicians who possess skills that can be applied in a variety of settings including clinical service, community consultation, teaching and education.

Value 3: We are committed to an emphasis on and understanding of human diversity as it affects the delivery of clinical services to diverse client groups. Training includes the opportunity to work with clients from diverse ethnic, socioeconomic and cultural groups in a wide variety of traditional and non-traditional service settings.

Value 4: We are committed to the facilitation of the development of professional identity and ethical professional practice.  Training allows interns to engage in a variety of professional roles and to do so with the expectation of a high level of professionalism and ethics.  In addition, faculty provide role models for professional and ethical practice.

Value 5: We are committed to flexibility in training.  Within the basic core structure of activities, interns are encouraged to develop unique interests and activities that will further their development as scholar-practitioners.

 

The PCOM Center for Brief Therapy

The pre-doctoral internship at PCOM is maintained at the on-campus comprehensive psychological services center, the Center for Brief Therapy, and in affiliated PCOM healthcare centers in the local community.  The Center for Brief Therapy is located on the 5th floor of the Rowland Hall Medical Office Building, and serves as a mental health resource to the students at the medical school and the local community.  Interns at The Center for Brief Therapy perform a variety of direct, face-to-face clinical services with patients, for a minimum of 25% of their time on internship, including individual and group psychotherapy, diagnosis and assessment, psychological testing, in-service training, consultation with teaching medical faculty and residents, supervision, and research and evaluation.  Clinical services at The Center for Brief Therapy include:

Psychotherapy Services

  • Individual Psychotherapy
  • Marital and Relationship Therapy
  • Family Therapy
  • Group Therapy

Comprehensive Psychological Assessment Service

  • Intelligence and Educational Testing
  • Testing for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder
  • Learning Disabilities Assessment
  • Evaluation of Psychological Effects of Medical Disorders
  • Behavioral and Personality Assessment

Clinical Issues Treated

  • Depression & Anxiety Disorders
  • Learning Difficulties
  • Psychological Complications of Cardiac Problems
  • Adjustment to Medical Problems (GI problems, pain, etc.)
  • Smoking Cessation
  • Eating Disorders
  • Child-Family Conflicts, Behavioral Conduct Problems
  • Marital/Relationship Difficulties
  • Substance Abuse

 

The Pre-doctoral Internship At The Center For Brief Therapy

The pre-doctoral internship in clinical psychology at the PCOM Center for Brief Therapy is designed to train future psychologists to work in health care settings as providers of comprehensive psychological services that stress multidisciplinary collaboration.  The PCOM Center for Brief Therapy strives to fulfill its mission in the on-campus PCOM Family Medical Practice, as well in community healthcare centers in three urban sites: the PCOM Roxborough Health Care Center, the Lancaster Avenue Health Care Center in West Philadelphia, and the Cambria Health Care Center in North Philadelphia.  In each of these centers, interns interact with medical and allied mental health professionals as a fully participatory member of the total health care team.  In addition, interns provide mental health services in the Center for Brief Therapy’s outpatient clinic at the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine, and in the Center for Academic Resources and Educational Services (CARES) program, a student-focused program designed to lend academic support services to medical students and graduate students who are members of the PCOM academic community.

Interns receive training and supervision in as broad a range of professional activities as possible, including: behavioral assessment, psychodiagnostics (including cognitive and personality testing); psychoeducational evaluations; clinical interventions (including individual and group psychotherapy, crisis intervention, milieu therapy, and work with families); consultation; applied clinical research (including clinical outcome research); and case management (including serving on treatment teams and developing prescriptive treatment programs), as appropriate.  In addition, interns gain experience in supervision of master’s level practicum students and multidisciplinary consultation with health care providers in a variety of contexts.

 

Intern Stipend

The Center for Brief Therapy is a not for profit clinic that is dedicated to serving the underserved in urban health centers in Philadelphia.  The annual stipend for interns for 2009-10 is $17,500 US.  Interns are entitled to 5 sick days a year, and 2 weeks of paid vacation, and are entitled to three days of paid conference time.  

 

Pre-doctoral Internship Goals

The internship's overarching goals are for the intern to refine and extend knowledge, skills and attitudes in the following areas:

  1. Relationship competency, by training interns who are able to demonstrate competency in their professional relationships in their ability to work collaboratively with peers, colleagues, students, faculty, supervisors, members of other disciplines, clients, and community organizations.

  2. Psychological Assessment, including developing specific skill sets involved in all facets of the evaluative process: determination of referral question, clinical interviewing and forming hypotheses, utilization of varied instruments and methodology, increasing familiarity with empirically supported measures and factors in deciding measures used, and presenting findings in written form.

  3. Intervention, including the provision of psychotherapy, interviewing clients and
    associated personnel, developing case formulations, formulating sound empirically-based
    treatment plans, delivering services, and evaluating treatment outcome for a diverse array
    of clients.

  4. Individual and Cultural Diversity, including sensitivity to, and knowledge and understanding of issues of individual and group differences and human diversity, as they impact on the assessment/evaluation, intervention, consultation and administrative functions of psychologists.

  5. Ethics, involving familiarity with and practice of the Ethics and Standards of
    Professional Practice in Pennsylvania as well as with other standards of care and conduct,
    including HIPAA regulations.

  6. Consultation and Collaboration with interdisciplinary treatment team members, and understanding the role of the clinical psychologist within a larger integrated health care system and community framework.

  7. Integration, in understanding the array of individual, familial, cultural, environmental,
    social, spiritual, gender-specific, medical, and physiological issues present in clients, and
    gaining sensitivity in the role of one’s own background in these domains and how they impact on interactions and treatment.

  8. Professional Development and life-long learning, in understanding the varied role of the clinical psychologist as a clinician, administrator, supervisor, entrepreneur, educator, and researcher in community and mental health settings, and implementation of the local clinical scientist model

 

Internship Activities

Clinical Problems Treated at The Center for Brief Therapy

Interns assess and treat clients with Axis I and Axis II disorders, as well as learning disorders and marital/family issues.  Typically, patients who are referred by physicians and residents in the community health care centers are seen for Axis I and Axis II disorders related to or co-occurring with medical problems.

Collaboration with Primary Care Physicians

In addition to regularly scheduled hours at the Center for Brief Therapy, interns serve rotations in the PCOM neighborhood family health care centers in three different  locations: Roxborough Center, Cambria Street Center, and the Lancaster Avenue practice.  These centers serve an urban, lower socioeconomic, culturally diverse population that are typically underserved recipients of mental health and medical care. While on rotation in these neighborhood health care centers, interns are expected to work closely with family practice physicians and medical residents to collaborate on assessment and treatment of patients, utilizing the bio-psycho-social model of assessment or treatment.  Psychotherapy sessions may be conducted at the neighborhood health care centers, or may be conducted at the Center for Brief Therapy on the PCOM campus.  In addition to assessment and treatment, psychoeducational services may be provided to the general community, including such diverse activities as smoking cessation groups, medication compliance groups, weight management groups, anger control, parent effectiveness training, relapse prevention for substance abuse, etc.  Referrals are often made to these psychoeducational services based on close collaboration with primary care physicians in the PCOM neighborhood health care practices.

Consultation Services

Interns at the Center for Brief Therapy are expected to serve an assignment involving consultation service in a variety of health care settings in the outpatient medical practices of the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine.  Consultation services include individual and a small group training of staff in issues related to applied behavioral assessment, implementation of cognitive-behavioral interventions based on empirically-supported treatment packages, and in-service training seminars related to prevention and early identification and intervention of mental health problems.

Psychological Testing and Assessment

 Interns are expected to complete at least 5 comprehensive psychological test batteries a year, in order to ensure competency in the assessment of a range of psychopathologies and medical problems with co-morbid mental health issues.  Assessments occur with populations across the lifespan, and often focus on specific learning disorders, testing for ADHD, and assessment of a variety of psychopathologies for the purpose of differential diagnosis, case conceptualization and treatment planning.  The Center for Brief Therapy maintains a wide variety of the most current instruments and assessment tools, including instruments used in cognitive assessment, health assessment, achievement testing, objective and projective assessment, and vocational assessment. Interns are also guided in the skill of providing feedback to consumers of psychological testing and milieu consultation, where appropriate. 

In addition, the Center for Brief Therapy serves as the primary referral resource for the CARES program, as a means of assessment for academic support to the PCOM medical and graduate student community.  
Issues for which interns may conduct psychological testing and assessment include:

1) Learning disorders, school failure, achievement problems
2) Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder
3) Evaluations of gifted students
4) Evaluations of patients with medical disorders and co-occurring psychological or mental health issues
5) Personality evaluation
6) Motivational assessment

Teaching

Interns are required to serve a 3-month assignment assisting in teaching activities in the PCOM Department of Psychology.  Supervision and mentoring from a core faculty supervisor is considered to be an integral part of this training and preparation for the role of the professional psychologist as teacher or instructor. Finally, interns are required to present a minimum of one in-service during the year to the local community or to a special interest group/support group on a topic related to their clinical interests.

Supervision

All interns at the internal internship (Center for Brief Therapy) serve as a formal "supervisory consultant" to a master’s level practicum trainee at the internal internship site.  Interns receive weekly supervision from a licensed psychologist who is on the core faculty and who oversees their clinical and supervisory practice.  Interns may also, with training and supervision, organize, administer, score, and review standardized patient (STEPPS) videotapes with master’s level students in the Department of  Psychology at PCOM.

Administration

Interns are expected to engage in primary triage activities at the Center for Brief Therapy.  These duties include responding to telephonic referral inquiries, conducting intake interviews, obtaining necessary information to make a clinical determination regarding level of service and appropriateness for service, and assisting with community resources for support. Interns perform quality improvement activities and policy and procedure setting roles, as assigned throughout the training year.  Interns also serve a rotation as team leader for regularly scheduled clinical team meetings at the Center for Brief Therapy.

Research

While involvement in research activities is not a formal requirement, interns are informally encouraged to collaborate with PCOM faculty on research projects and/or pursue their own research projects as the intern’s interests and time permits.  Interns are encouraged to utilize data collected at the Center for Brief Therapy, or to use their experiences in the community-based health care centers to generate questions and research protocols that have their origins in the concept of local science.  As such, interns are encouraged to engage in research that is relevant to their clinical experiences in the field, and that will help to answer clinical questions that are generated from actual clinical experience.

 

Didactic Training

In accordance with APPIC internship standards, all interns are required to participate in regularly scheduled didactic training seminars at the internship site for an equivalent of 2 hours a week.  These training seminars are designed to ensure an experience of developmental learning and permit adequate socialization as an internship cohort.  The didactic training seminars are held once a month on Fridays for 6 hours each session, and 5 Saturdays throughout the training year for 5 hours each session.  In addition, interns attend and participate in an annual Supervisor Appreciation Day training program for 5 hours.  These scheduled trainings account for a total of 102 hours per year.  Interns are permitted one absence from didactic seminars, giving them a grand total of 96 hours of didactics, or an equivalent of 2 hours a week for training.

The didactic training seminars at the Center for Brief Therapy focus on a broad variety of professional issues including assessment techniques, psychological testing, clinical health psychology, empirically supported interventions, ethical issues in treatment, applied behavior analysis, cultural diversity issues, case conceptualization, professional issues including legal/risk management, managed cared issues, models of psychological consultation, dealing with difficult patients, noncompliance and resistance, clinical supervisory  issues, and methods of office-based research. 

The schedule for the Friday Didactic Seminars is typically as follows:

9:00 AM – 11:00 AM: Assessment Seminar (2 hours didactics and case presentation with group discussion).  If a case presentation is part of the agenda, interns will be expected to prepare data/case material for analysis and discussion, and distribute information to the seminar leader and intern peers at least 3 days prior to meeting. Each participant is expected to prepare notes for discussion related to diagnostic and treatment planning issues relevant to the case.

11:00 AM – 1:00 PM: Current Topics in Professional Psychology (includes intern lunch for peer interaction and discussion)

1:00 PM – 3:00 PMIntervention Case Conference (focusing on use of empirically supported treatments with a diverse variety of clients). Interns are expected to prepare data/case material for discussion, and distribute information to the seminar leader and intern peers at least 3 days prior to meeting. Each participant is expected to actively participate in discussion and role plays, as determined by the seminar leader.

The intern seminars are typically led by members of the core faculty at the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine, supervisors in external training sites, or by invited guest speakers.  The purpose of these seminars is to foster broad interaction and shared learning experiences for the intern cohort as a whole.  The didactic training schedule for 2009-10 is listed below.

The Saturday Didactic Seminars are generally focused on issues related to Risk Management and Ethics.

 FRIDAY DIDACTIC SEMINARS 2009-10

Date Time Seminar Leader/Instructor Topic
7/10/09 9:00 AM – 11:00 AM Bruce S. Zahn, Ed.D., ABPP Assessment Seminar and Case Conference: Assessment with Older Adults
7/10/09 11:00 AM – 1:00 PM Bruce S. Zahn, Ed.D., ABPP Current Issues in Professional Psychology: Understanding Alzheimer’s Disease and Managing Problematic Behaviors
7/10/09 1:00 PM – 3:00 PM Bruce S. Zahn, Ed.D., ABPP Intervention Seminar and Case Conference: CBT with the Elderly
8/14/09 9:00 AM – 11:00 AM Terry Molony, Psy.D. Assessment Seminar and Case Conference: Assessment of ADHD
8/14/09 11:00 AM – 1:00 PM Terry Molony, Psy.D. Current Issues in Professional Psychology:  ADHD in Children: Nature, Diagnosis and Management
8/14/09 1:00 PM – 3:00 PM Terry Molony, Psy.D. Intervention Seminar and Case Conference: IDEA 2007 and recommendations for intervention with children with ADHD
9/11/09 9:00 AM – 11:00 AM Brad Rosenfield, Psy.D. Assessment Seminar and Case Conference: Assessing Depression
9/11/09 11:00 AM – 1:00 PM Brad Rosenfield, Psy.D. Current Issues in Professional Psychology: Cognitive Therapy for Treatment Resistant Depression
9/11/09 1:00 PM – 3:00 PM Brad Rosenfield, Psy.D. Intervention Seminar and Case Conference: Overcoming “resistance” in Tx of Depression
10/30/09 9:00 AM – 11:00 AM Susan M. Panichelli Mindel, Ph.D. Assessment Seminar and Case Conference: Assessment tools and strategies when working with children and adolescents
10/30/09 11:00 AM – 1:00 PM Susan M. Panichelli Mindel, Ph.D. Current Issues in Professional Psychology: TBA
10/30/09 1:00 PM – 3:00 PM Susan M. Panichelli Mindel, Ph.D. Intervention Seminar and Case Conference: Fundamentals of treating disorders of children and adolescence
11/13/09 9:00 AM – 11:00 AM Bruce S. Zahn, Ed.D., ABPP Assessment Seminar and Case Conference: Convergence and Divergence in Assessment
11/13/09 11:00 AM – 1:00 PM Bart Singer, Ph.D. Current Issues in Professional Psychology:  A Wayfarers' Journey: An exploration of the relationship between music and healing
11/13/09 1:00 PM – 3:00 PM Bart Singer, Ph.D. Intervention Seminar and Case Conference: Mindfulness and Healing
12/11/09 9:00 AM – 11:00 AM Petra Kottsieper, Ph.D. Assessment Seminar and Case Conference: Assessing the therapeutic alliance
12/11/09 11:00 AM – 1:00 PM Petra Kottsieper, Ph.D. Current Issues in Professional Psychology:  Therapeutic Alliance: What Works in Therapy
12/11/09 1:00 PM – 3:00 PM Petra Kottsieper, Ph.D. Intervention Seminar and Case Conference: Motivational Interviewing Techniques
1/15/10 9:00 AM – 11:00 AM Stephanie Felgoise, Ph.D., ABPP Assessment Seminar and Case Conference: Introduction to the Problem Solving Inventory
1/15/10 11:00 AM – 1:00 PM Stephanie Felgoise, Ph.D., ABPP Current Issues in Professional Psychology: Getting Board Certified: The ABPP Process
1/15/10 1:00 PM – 3:00 PM Stephanie Felgoise, Ph.D., ABPP Intervention Seminar and Case Conference: Problem-Solving Therapy for Medical Patients
2/12/10 9:00 AM – 11:00 AM Elizabeth Gosch, Ph.D., ABPP Assessment Seminar and Case Conference: Assessment of Anxiety in Children
2/12/10 11:00 AM – 1:00 PM Elizabeth Gosch, Ph.D., ABPP Current Issues in Professional Psychology:  Substance Abuse Assessment, Diagnosis and Initial Treatment Planning
2/12/10 1:00 PM – 3:00 PM Elizabeth Gosch, Ph.D., ABPP Intervention Seminar and Case Conference: Treatment of Anxiety in Children
3/12/10 9:00 AM – 11:00 AM

Robert DiTomasso, Ph.D, ABPP &
Deborah Chiumento, Psy.D.

Assessment Seminar and Case Conference: Assessment of Medical Non-adherence
3/12/10 11:00 AM – 1:00 PM Robert DiTomasso, Ph.D, ABPP &
Deborah Chiumento, Psy.D.
Current Issues in Professional Psychology:  Addressing Substance Using Clients’ Resistance and Successfully Engaging Them in Outpatient Treatment
3/12/10 1:00 PM – 3:00 PM

Robert DiTomasso, Ph.D, ABPP &
Deborah Chiumento, Psy.D.

Intervention Seminar and Case Conference: Intervention Strategies with Clients who are Non-adhering to Medical Advice
4/9/10 9:00 AM – 11:00 AM Stacey Cahn, Ph.D. Assessment Seminar and Case Conference: Eating Disorders Assessment
4/9/10 11:00 AM – 1:00 PM Stacey Cahn, Ph.D. Current Issues in Professional Psychology:  Using the Dysfunctional Thought Record in Treatment
4/9/10 1:00 PM – 3:00 PM Stacey Cahn, Ph.D. Intervention Seminar and Case Conference: Treatment Strategies with Eating Disorders
5/14/10 9:00 AM – 11:00 AM Beverly White, Psy.D. Assessment Seminar and Case Conference: Multicultural Assessment
5/14/10 11:00 AM – 1:00 PM Beverly White, Psy.D. Current Issues in Professional Psychology:  Multicultural Competence in Supervision
5/14/10 1:00 PM – 3:00 PM Beverly White, Psy.D. Intervention Seminar and Case Conference: Case conceptualization
6/11/10 9:00 AM – 11:00 AM Terry Molony, Psy.D. Assessment Seminar and Case Conference: Positive Psychology
6/11/10 11:00 AM – 1:00 PM Terry Molony, Psy.D. Current Issues in Professional Psychology: Positive Psychology
6/11/10 1:00 PM – 3:00 PM Terry Molony, Psy.D. Intervention Seminar and Case Conference: Positive Psychology

SUPERVISOR APPRECIATION DAY 2009
SEPTEMBER 25, 2009

Date Time Seminar Leader Topic
9/25/09 9:00 AM – 12:15 PM Sam Knapp, Ed.D.  Contemporary Ethical Perspectives on Supervision
9/25/09 1:30 PM – 3:30 PM Petra Kottsieper, Ph.D.  Dialectical Behavior Therapy: An Introduction and Overview

SATURDAY DIDACTIC SEMINARS 2009-10

Date Time Seminar Leader Topic
6/30/09 9:00 AM – 12:00 PM Susanna Gilbertson  Assessing and Working with  Victims of Domestic Violence
6/30/09 1:00 PM – 3:00 PM Takako Suzuki , Ph.D.  Exposure based Anxiety Management skills training
7/18/09 9:00 AM – 12:00 PM Norman Weissberg, Ph.D.

Suicide Assessment

7/18/09 1:00 PM – 3:00 PM Terry Molony, Psy.D. ADHD  -  Current Research and Treatment
9/26/09 9:00 AM – 12:00 PM Terry Molony, Psy.D. Assessing and Diagnosing Reading Disorders
9/26/09 1:00 PM – 3:00 PM Amy McLaughlin, Psy.D.

ADHD Assessment

11/7/09 9:00 AM – 11:00 AM Barbara Golden, Psy.D., ABPP

Pain Management

11/7/09 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM Takako Suzuki , Ph.D.  Progressive Muscle Relaxation training with Clients
11/7/09 1:00 PM – 3:00 PM Petra Kottsieper, Ph.D. 

Therapist Self Disclosure

2/20/10 9:00 AM – 12:00 PM Family Support Alliance

Mandated Reporter Training

2/20/10 1:00 PM – 3:00 PM Amy McLaughlin, Psy.D.

Assessment strategies and clinical application for the school evaluation

 

Intern Evaluation

Supervisors submit a semi-annual formal evaluation of each intern’s progress. Interns are evaluated after they have completed six months of their internship training and at the end of the year. A form is given to the key supervising psychologist that invites commentary on both specific areas of skill as well as general professional demeanor. These evaluation forms are to be discussed with the interns and then signed by both the intern and the supervisor. Interns are given the opportunity to respond to any comments made by the supervisor with which they disagree and to have the response included with the evaluation. Evaluations should be based on an accurate picture of each student’s work. Supervisors should observe sessions, view videotapes or listen to audiotapes of sessions on a regular basis. There should be clear on-going communication between interns and their supervisors throughout the year on areas of strength and weakness. Interns should never be surprised by the feedback they receive on the formal evaluation because they should be obtaining this information over the course of the year in supervision.

 

The PCOM Director of Clinical Training will receive and read these forms. If the evaluation reveals that an intern is having minor difficulties at the internship site, the Director of Clinical Training may: (a) obtain more information from the key supervisor; b) meet with the Director of Clinical Services at the Center for Brief Therapy to discuss the nature of the difficulties, and/or (b) discuss the difficulties with the intern. If an intern appears to have significant difficulties, the following process will be initiated:

  1. 1) The evaluation will be presented to the Clinical Training Committee, consisting of the Director of Clinical Training, the Internship Coordinator, the Practicum Coordinator, the Director of Clinical Services at the Center for Brief Therapy, and at least 2 other ad hoc faculty members from the PCOM Psy.D. program in Clinical Psychology. A preliminary determination will be made as to whether the difficulty appears to be a long-standing one or a problem that has emerged in this particular site. Contacting the intern’s program Director of Clinical Training may be an option in attempting to determine the scope of the problem, especially if it is suspected that it is of long-standing nature.  In some cases, the problem may be of such a nature to be addressed through a discussion between the intern and the Director of the Clinical Training or through the resources of the setting itself.
  2. In other instances, a second review may be necessary using any of the following resources:

    a) the intern
    b) the Director of the PsyD Program
    c) the supervisory staff at the Center for Brief Therapy.  As a consequence of this review, the committee may suggest that the Director of Clinical Training and/or his/her designee have regular sessions with the intern to discuss, for example, the intern's difficulty in using supervision constructively.
    d) If the aforementioned reviews and lines of intervention do not seem sufficient to deal with the problem at hand, a final decision will be made by the Student Progress Evaluation Committee (SPEC) of the PsyD Program in Clinical Psychology.

  3. A final appeal may be made by the student to the Chair of the Department of Psychology.

 

Grievance Procedure

In his or her capacity as an intern, a student might have a grievance against any party associated with the internship (e.g., faculty member, on-site supervisor). The intern is strongly encouraged to first resolve the issue informally with the party involved. If the student has attempted to do so unsuccessfully or believes he or she is unable to do so without the assistance of an external party, the intern is encouraged to proceed through as many of the following steps as may be necessary for the resolution of the problem.

  1. Discuss the issue with the Director of Clinical Training.  At this initial exploratory stage, the student may speak confidentially to the either of these members of the Clinical Training Committee who will help to clarify the problem. In some cases, this contact may be sufficient to resolve the complaint.

  2. If necessary, the Director of Clinical Training may, with the permission of the intern, perform an informal investigation which may include interviewing the parties involved or any party who has evidence concerning the validity of the complaint.

  3. If this informal investigation fails to lead to the resolution of the grievance, the Director of Clinical Training will assist the grievant in formulating a plan of action. This plan of action may take the form of utilizing the grievance procedure.

  4. If such procedures are used and are unsuccessful in resolving the complaint in the eyes of the student, then a formal meeting of the Grievance Panel of the Clinical Training Committee will review the complaint. Such a review is formal and requires a written complaint on the part of the student. The Grievance Panel is composed of the members of the Clinical Training Committee and an additional faculty member, typically the Intern’s supervisor. If the supervisor is already on the Panel, a member will be chosen randomly from the faculty. The Grievance Panel will render a decision about the complaint that will be communicated in writing to all parties involved.  

  5. If it is impossible to resolve the matter at this level, the student may appeal to the Student Progress Evaluation Committee.    

  6. If the decision involves the withdrawal of the intern from the site, or if the student wishes to make an appeal, the complaint will be reviewed by the Chair of the PCOM Department of Psychology.

A final appeal may be made to the Dean of the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine.

 

Due Process

The intern supervisor and Director of Clinical Services for the PCOM Center for Brief Therapy are responsible for clearly documenting significant problem areas of the intern’s performance as soon as they are noted, discussing these with the intern, and working with the intern and other supervising faculty to correct the problems.  The intern’s supervisor and Director of Clinical Services discuss the specific problem(s), determine how and by whom the intern will be informed of the problem, and by whom efforts to correct the problem will be initiated.  A meeting may be held between the intern, the Director of Clinical Services, and the PCOM Director of Clinical Training, to gather information and evaluate options for resolving the problem.  Depending on the seriousness of the issues, remedial options may be developed in consultation with the Chair of the PCOM Student Progress Evaluation Committee.  Following this meeting, a letter is sent to the intern, with a copy to the intern’s file, the intern’s primary supervisor, the Director of Clinical Training, and the Director of the Psy.D. Program, outlining the concerns identified in the meeting and recommendations for corrective actions.

All interns at the PCOM Center for Brief Therapy are expected to maintain the standards established by the psychology profession and by the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine in order to successfully complete the internship.  In order to safeguard student rights and to ensure the standards of the profession and the school, the Psychology Department has established policy and guidelines for discontinuance of a student from internship.

Definition of Problematic Behavior

Problematic Behavior is defined broadly as an interference in professional functioning which is reflected in one or more of the following ways: 1) an inability and/or unwillingness to acquire and integrate professional standards into one's repertoire of professional behavior; 2) an inability to acquire professional skills in order to reach an acceptable level of competency; and/or 3) an inability to control personal stress, strong emotional reactions, and/or psychological dysfunction which interfere with professional functioning.

It is a professional judgment as to when an intern's behavior becomes problematic rather than of concern. Trainees may exhibit behaviors, attitudes or characteristics which, while of concern and requiring remediation, are not unexpected or excessive for professionals in training.

Remediation and Sanction Alternatives

It is important to have meaningful ways to address problematic behavior once it has been identified. In implementing remediation or sanction interventions, the training staff must be mindful and balance the needs of the intern, the clients involved, members of the intern training group and staff.

1. Verbal Warning to the intern emphasizes the need to discontinue the inappropriate behavior under discussion. No record of this action is kept.

2. Written Acknowledgment to the intern formally acknowledges:

    1. That the Director of Clinical Services, the Director of Clinical Training, and the Chair of the PCOM Student Progress and Evaluation Committee (SPEC) are aware of and concerned with the performance rating,
    2. That the concern has been brought to the attention of the intern,
    3. That the Director of Clinical Services, the Director of Clinical Training, and the Chair of the PCOM Student Progress and Evaluation Committee (SPEC) will work with the intern to rectify the problem or skill deficits, and
    4. That the behaviors associated with the rating are not significant enough to warrant more serious action.

The written acknowledgment will be removed from the intern's file when the intern responds to the concerns and successfully completes the internship.

Written Warning to the intern indicates the need to discontinue an inappropriate action or behavior. This letter will contain:

  1. A description of the intern's unsatisfactory performance;
  2. Actions needed by the intern to correct the unsatisfactory behavior;
  3. The time line for correcting the problem;
  4. What action will be taken if the problem is not corrected; and
  5. Notification that the intern has the right to request a review of this action.

Schedule Modification is a time-limited, remediation-oriented closely supervised period of training designed to return the intern to a more fully functioning state. Modifying an intern's schedule is an accommodation made to assist the intern in responding to personal reactions to environmental stress, with the full expectation that the intern will complete the internship. This period will include more closely scrutinized supervision conducted by the regular supervisor in consultation with the Director of Clinical Services, the Director of Clinical Training, and the Chair of the PCOM Student Progress and Evaluation Committee (SPEC). Several possible and perhaps concurrent courses of action may be included in modifying a schedule. These include:

  1. Increasing the amount of supervision, either with the same or other supervisors;
  2. Change in the format, emphasis, and/or focus of supervision;
  3. Reducing the intern's clinical or other workload;
  4. Requiring specific didactic coursework;
  5. Recommending an independent psychological or psychiatric evaluation or personal therapy. 

The length of a schedule modification period will be determined by the Director of Clinical Services, the Director of Clinical Training, and the Chair of the PCOM Student Progress and Evaluation Committee (SPEC). The termination of the schedule modification period will be determined, after discussions with the intern, Director of Clinical Services, the PCOM Clinical Training Committee, and the Chair of the PCOM Student Progress and Evaluation Committee (SPEC).

Probation is also a time limited, remediation-oriented, more closely supervised training period. It's purpose is to assess the ability of the intern to complete the internship and to return the intern to a more fully functioning state. Probation defines a relationship that the Director of Clinical Services, the Director of Clinical Training, and the Chair of the PCOM Student Progress and Evaluation Committee (SPEC) systematically monitor for a specific length of time the degree to which the intern addresses, changes and/or otherwise improves the behavior associated with the inadequate rating. The intern is informed of the probation in a written statement which includes:

  1. The specific behaviors associated with the unacceptable rating;
  2. The recommendations for rectifying the problem;
  3. The time frame for the probation during which the problem is expected to be ameliorated, and
  4. The procedures to ascertain whether the problem has been appropriately rectified. 

If the Director of Clinical Services, the Director of Clinical Training, and the Chair of the PCOM Student Progress and Evaluation Committee (SPEC) determine that there has not been sufficient improvement in the intern's behavior to remove the Probation or modified schedule, then they will discuss possible courses of action to be taken.

The Chair of the PCOM Student Progress and Evaluation Committee (SPEC) will communicate in writing to the intern that the conditions for revoking the probation or modified schedule have not been met. This notice will include the course of action the Student Progress and Evaluation Committee (SPEC) has decided to implement. These may include continuation of the remediation efforts for a specified time period or implementation of another alternative. Additionally, the Chair of the PCOM Student Progress and Evaluation Committee (SPEC) will communicate to the Director of Clinical Services that if the intern's behavior does not change, the intern will not successfully complete the internship.

Suspension of Direct Service Activities requires a determination that the welfare of the intern's client or consultee has been jeopardized. Therefore, direct service activities will be suspended for a specified period as determined by the Director of Clinical Services, the PCOM Clinical Training Committee, and the Chair of the PCOM Student Progress and Evaluation Committee (SPEC). At the end of the suspension period, the intern's supervisor, in consultation with the Director of Clinical Services, the PCOM Clinical Training Committee, and the Chair of the PCOM Student Progress and Evaluation Committee (SPEC) will assess the intern's capacity for effective functioning and determine when direct service can be resumed.

Administrative Leave involves the temporary withdrawal of all responsibilities and privileges in the agency. If the Probation Period, Suspension of Direct Service Activities, or Administrative Leave interferes with the successful completion of the training hours needed for completion of the internship, this will be noted in the intern's file and the intern's academic program will be informed.

Dismissal from the Internship involves the permanent withdrawal of all agency responsibilities and privileges. When specific interventions do not, after a reasonable time period, rectify the problem behavior or concerns and the trainee seems unable or unwilling to alter her/his behavior, the Director of Clinical Services, the Director of Clinical Training, and the Chair of the PCOM Student Progress and Evaluation Committee (SPEC) will meet to discuss the possibility of termination from the internship and training program. Either administrative leave or dismissal would be invoked in cases of severe violations of the APA Code of Ethics, or when imminent physical or psychological harm to a client is a major factor, or the intern is unable to complete the internship due to physical, mental or emotional illness. When an intern has been dismissed, the Director of Clinical Training will communicate to the intern's academic department that the intern has not successfully completed the internship.

Procedures for Responding to Inadequate Performance by an Intern
If an intern receives an "unacceptable rating" from any of the evaluation sources in any of the major categories of evaluation, or if a staff member or supervising faculty member has concerns about an intern's behavior (ethical or legal violations, professional incompetence) the following procedures will be initiated:

  1. The primary intern supervisor will consult with the Director of Clinical Services and the Director of Clinical Training to determine if there is reason to proceed and/or if the behavior in question is being rectified.
  2. If the supervisor or staff member who brings the concern to the Director of Clinical Services and the Director of Clinical Training is not the intern's primary supervisor, the Director of Clinical Services and the Director of Clinical Training will discuss the concern with the intern's primary supervisor.
  3. If the Director of Clinical Services and the Director of Clinical Training and primary supervisor determine that the alleged behavior in the complaint, if proven, would constitute a serious violation, the Director of Clinical Services and the Director of Clinical Training will inform the staff member who initially brought the complaint.
  4. The Director of Clinical Services and the Director of Clinical Training will meet with the Chair of the Student Progress and Evaluation Committee to discuss the performance rating or the concern and possible courses of action to be taken to address the issues. The Director of Clinical Services, the Director of Clinical Training, and the Chair of the PCOM Student Progress and Evaluation Committee (SPEC) may meet to discuss possible course of actions.
  5. Whenever a decision has been made by the Director of Clinical Services, the Director of Clinical Training, and the Chair of the PCOM Student Progress and Evaluation Committee (SPEC) about an intern's training program or status in the agency, the Director of Clinical Services, the Director of Clinical Training, and the Chair of the PCOM Student Progress and Evaluation Committee will inform the intern in writing and will meet with the intern to review the decision. This meeting may include the intern's primary supervisor. If the intern accepts the decision, any formal action taken by the Internship Program may be communicated in writing to the intern's academic department. This notification indicates the nature of the concern and the specific alternatives implemented to address the concern.
  6. The intern may choose to accept the conditions or may choose to challenge the action.
  7. The procedures for challenging the action are presented below.

Due Process: General Guidelines

Due process ensures that decisions about interns are not arbitrary or personally based. It requires that the Internship Program identify specific evaluative procedures which are applied to all trainees, and provide appropriate appeal procedures available to the intern. All steps need to be appropriately documented and implemented. General due process guidelines include:

During the orientation period, presenting to the interns, in writing, the program's expectations related to professional functioning. This will be discussed in both group and individual settings.

  1. Stipulating the procedures for evaluation, including when and how evaluations will be conducted. Such evaluations should occur at meaningful intervals.
  2. Articulating the various procedures and actions involved in making decisions regarding the problem behavior or concerns.
  3. Communicating, early and often, with graduate programs about any suspected difficulties with interns and when necessary, seeking input from these academic programs about how to address such difficulties.
  4. Instituting, when appropriate, a remediation plan for identified inadequacies, including a time frame for expected remediation and consequences of not rectifying the inadequacies.
  5. Providing a written procedure to the intern which describes how the intern may appeal the program's action. Such procedures are included in the PCOM Internship Handbook which is provided to interns and reviewed during orientation.
  6. Ensuring that interns have sufficient time to respond to any action taken by the program.
  7. Using input from multiple professional sources when making decisions or recommendations regarding the intern's performance.
  8. Documenting, in writing and to all relevant parties, the actions taken by the program and its rationale.

Due Process: Procedures

The basic meaning of due process is to inform and to provide a framework to respond, act or dispute. When a matter cannot be resolved between the Director of Clinical Services and the supervising faculty or staff at the Center for Brief Therapy and the intern, the steps to be taken are listed below. Steps involved in the Due Process procedure include:

  1. Notice: The intern will be notified of the problematic behavior and that the internship is addressing the problem.

    a. If the problem is initially identified by a supervisor or staff member other than the Director of Clinical Services, the Director of Clinical Services will be consulted.
    b. If the issue is not resolved informally, the supervisor or staff member may seek resolution of the concern by written request, with all supporting documents, to the Director of Clinical Services, the Director of Clinical Training, and the Chair of the Student Progress and Evaluation Committee for a review of the situation.
    c. When this occurs, within three days of a formal complaint, the aforementioned parties must consult with the Chair of the Department of Psychology and implement a Review Panel by the procedures described below.
  2. Hearing: The intern will have an opportunity to hear and respond to concerns. A review panel will be convened by the Chair of the Department of Psychology. The panel will consist of three faculty members selected by the Chair of the Student Progress and Evaluation Committee with recommendations from the Director of Clinical Training and the intern involved in the dispute. The intern has the right to hear all facts with the opportunity to dispute or explain the behavior of concern.

    a. Within five (5) work days, a hearing will be conducted in which the challenge is heard and relevant material presented. Within three (3) work days of the completion of the review, the Review Panel submits a written report to the Chair of the Department of Psychology, including any recommendations for further action. Recommendations made by the Review Panel will be made by majority vote.
    b. Within three (3) work days of receipt of the recommendation, the Chair of the Department of Psychology will either accept or reject the Review Panel's recommendations. If the Director rejects the panel's recommendations, due to an incomplete or inadequate evaluation of the dispute, the Chair of the Department of Psychology may refer the matter back to the Review Panel for further deliberation and revised recommendations or may make a final decision.
    c. If referred back to the panel, they will report back to the Chair of the Department of Psychology within five (5) work days of the receipt of the Chair of the Department of Psychology’s request of further deliberation. The Chair of the Department of Psychology then makes a final decision regarding what action is to be taken.
    d. The Chair of the Student Progress and Evaluation Committee informs the intern, faculty and/or staff members involved and if necessary members of the training staff of the decision and any action taken or to be taken.

  3. Appeal: The intern will have an opportunity to appeal the actions taken by the Internship program through submission of a letter to the Chair of the Department of Psychology within five days of notification of the Hearing’s decision. The Chair of the Department of Psychology will then collaborate with the PCOM Director of Clinical Training and the intern’s applicable faculty member/or Director of Clinical Training within their graduate program in order to determine an alternate course of action or maintain the hearing’s decision in consideration of the intern’s appeal. Formal documentation will occur of the appeal decision.
  4. Interns who are matriculated at PCOM: The Due Process procedures articulated above apply to all interns who are at the PCOM Center for Brief Therapy.  In addition to these procedures, interns who are matriculated as students at the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine are subject to the College Disciplinary Procedures that are described in the PCOM General Student Handbook, which is located at the Nucleus intranet site under the Student Handbooks & Composites tab.


Application
Requirements

This internship site agrees to abide by the APPIC policy that no person at this training facility will solicit, accept or use any ranking-related information from any intern applicant.

Prospective interns are expected to apply for internship at the PCOM Center for Brief Therapy by completing the following materials.  All application materials must be received by no later than November 16, 2009.

  1. APPIC Uniform Application materials (AAPIOnline: including Professional Conduct Form, Practicum Documentation, Verification of Internship Eligibility and Readiness, etc.), found at www.appic.org.

  2. Curriculum vita

  3. Official Graduate transcripts

  4. One assessment report (remember to remove all identifying information)

  5. A written report of a case conceptualization.  The case conceptualization is to reflect a cognitive-behavioral framework for understanding the client and for intervention.

  6. Three letters of reference (must be from current practicum supervisors or core doctoral faculty members)

  7. NatMatch code (obtained from National Matching Services, Inc., 595 Bay Street, Suite 301, Box 29, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5G 2C2)

Please submit all materials to:

Bruce S. Zahn, EdD, ABPP
Director of Clinical Training
Department of Psychology
Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine
4190 City Avenue,
Rowland Hall, Suite 226
Philadelphia, PA 19131
Tel: 215-871-6498
Email: brucez@pcom.edu

 

About PCOM

Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine offers nine graduate programs in the field of psychology taught by an internationally renowned, highly credentialed faculty.  All faculty members in PCOM´s APA-accredited PsyD program in Clinical Psychology are teaching faculty who work closely with students to help them achieve their professional goals.  Students often have the opportunity to coauthor scholarly papers, books and professional presentations with faculty.

In addition, because it is part of a respected medical college, the Psychology Department is able to offer unique learning opportunities.  PCOM has the only psychology department in the country that provides a standardized patient program (STEPPS).  The standardized patient program presents authentic clinical learning and skills situations in which "patients" simulate mental health conditions.  Students conduct sessions with the patients, which are videotaped and reviewed by faculty to help train and assess the students´ skills.  Students in the psychology program also have the opportunity for clinical experience at one of the College´s urban health care centers.

 

Training and Supervising Faculty

ROBERT A. DITOMASSO, PH.D., ABPP (Diplomate in Clinical Psychology)
Professor and Chair, Department of Psychology
Areas of Interest:  Dr. DiTomasso, Chairman of the Department of Psychology, is board certified in clinical psychology by the American Board of Professional Psychology, a Fellow of the Academy of Clinical Psychology, a Founding Fellow of the Academy of Cognitive Therapy, and a licensed psychologist in Pennsylvania and New Jersey.  He has extensive experience in cognitive behavioral therapy, graduate-level teaching, research/program evaluation and psychological consultation in medical settings.

Dr. DiTomasso's major areas of interest are cognitive-behavioral assessment, therapy, and consultation, anxiety and anxiety-related disorders, primary care psychology, patient non-adherence, developing assessment instruments for health risk behaviors, and research design, measurement, methodology and program evaluation.  Over the past several years, Dr. DiTomasso and his dissertation students have been developing and studying a variety of new measures including The MAD-AS, an anger questionnaire, The Inventory of Cognitive Distortions (ICD), and the HABIT (Health Adherence Behavior Inventory). Dr. DiTomasso was recently named as the recipient of the Dondero Award from LaSalle University, honoring an alumnus who has distinguished himself in promoting the science and/or practice of psychology according to the humanistic values that were at the basis of the life and teaching of the late John Dondero, PhD.

STEPHANIE H. FELGOISE, PH.D., ABPP (Diplomate in Clinical Psychology)  
Professor and Director, PsyD in Clinical Psychology
Areas of Interest:  Dr. Felgoise joined the faculty of PCOM in July 1999. She earned her MA and PhD in clinical psychology from Hahnemann University, after completing an APA-accredited internship in clinical/community psychology at UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, in Piscataway, NJ.  Her postdoctoral training in Health Psychology and Research from Hahnemann University, and her private clinical practice positions her to mentor students in clinical work, research, scholarship and professional affiliation. Dr. Felgoise earned her diplomate in clinical psychology by the American Board of Professional Psychology, and is a Fellow of the American Academy of Clinical Psychology.

Dr. Felgoise's research focuses on quality of life in, and psychosocial aspects of, ALS (Lou Gherig's Disease) and Long QT Syndrome (LQTS, a life-threatening cardiac arrhythmia condition). Research on these topics have emphasized factors relating to quality of life, social problem solving, coping and adjustment, resilience factors, and comorbid psychological conditions (i.e., anxiety, depression).  ALS  research has focused on adults and their lay caregivers; LQTS research focuses on children and adolescents and their parental caregivers. Dr. Felgoise has been a co-principal investigator for several studies and a program of research focusing on quality of life issues for persons with ALS and their family caregivers. These research projects have been funded by the ALS Association and the Christopher Reeves Foundation. She and her collaborators have published their works in the Annals of Behavioral Medicine, Neurology, and Quality of Life journals.  Her LQTS studies are funded by the Center for Chronic Disorders of Aging.

BARBARA A. GOLDEN, PSY.D. , ABPP  (Diplomate in Clinical Psychology)
Associate Professor, Director of Clinical Services
Areas of Interest:  As the director of the Center for Brief Therapy (the training site for the Psychology Department), Dr. Golden has expanded services from our on-campus training site to the PCOM neighborhood Healthcare Centers and other sites.  In keeping with the mission of PCOM, the Healthcare Centers offer service to people around the city who otherwise may not receive them.  In addition to the neighborhood Healthcare Centers, the psychology students work in Geriatrics, Internal Medicine and Pediatrics and in Philadelphia Senior Centers.  Psychology students have the opportunity to work with medical students, medical residents and family medicine physicians to offer behavioral health care to a wide variety of populations.  In addition to direct service, the psychology students under Dr. Golden’s supervision offer in-service training to other social service agencies, schools and churches. 

As a member of the American Psychological Association and the Pennsylvania Psychological Association, Dr. Golden presents at annual conventions with PCOM students.  These presentations have included topics of psychology and primary care, psychology and chronic medical illness, chronic and acute pain management, and psychology in urban healthcare settings.

Dr. Golden has collaborated with the College's Department of Family Medicine on several multidisciplinary research projects.  Her publications include topics related to nonpharmacology and chronic pain management.

TAKAKO SUZUKI, PH.D.
Assistant Professor, Assistant Director of Clinical Services; Clinical Coordinator, CARES program
Areas of Interest: Maintaining relationships with the Japanese community is important for Dr. Suzuki.  She serves as vice-president and director of mental health for the Japanese Association of Greater Philadelphia.  For a number of years she has been writing a column entitled, “Managing stress while living in America” for the association’s newsletter.  Through this column, she attends to the special problems of Japanese expatriates and sojourners, as well as interracial married couples.  Dr. Suzuki consults with the Japanese Language School of Philadelphia, where she addresses challenging issues that derive from the ever-changing needs of parents who are raising Japanese and biracial children in the United States while aiming to keep Japanese cultural connections.  As a consultant for the employment assistance program at Nationwide Insurance, International SOS Assistance, Inc., she assists Japanese employees who work for American corporations and their families with adjustment issues related to a new environment and with mental health issues.  Also, through an online forum, she advises Japanese mothers who struggle with their own acculturation, marital issues, and the challenges of raising children in another culture.

Dr. Suzuki’s research interests include anxiety and stress-related disorders and culturally sensitive treatments of complex issues with broadly defined multicultural populations.  Religion, spirituality, emotional intelligence, and development of empathy are related interests, as are quality of life issues with geriatric populations. 
   
BRUCE S. ZAHN, ED.D. , ABPP (Diplomate in Clinical Psychology)
Professor, Director of Clinical Training
Areas of Interest: Dr. Zahn is a licensed psychologist who has a broad variety of clinical experiences with patient populations ranging from children to older adults.  In his capacity as Director of Clinical Training, Dr. Zahn is leader of the Clinical Training Committee and is responsible for the direction and coordination of all practicum and internship activities.  He also acts as the Clinical Training Committee consultant to the Student Progress and Evaluation Committee (SPEC).  Dr. Zahn is the program's lead delegate to the NCSPP (National Council of Schools of Professional Psychology). Within the PCOM community, Dr. Zahn has served as a member of the Appointments, Promotions and Tenure Committee and the Academic Appeals Committee.  He also is a Board Member of the Inter-faith Housing Alliance of Ambler, serving families in Montgomery County to overcome homelessness (http://www.i-fha.org).

Dr. Zahn’s research interests include clinical supervision, diversity issues in clinical training and practice, homelessness, psychological testing (including projective personality assessment), and cognitive therapy with older adults.

ELIZABETH A. GOSCH, PH.D., ABPP (Diplomate in Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology)
Associate Professor
Areas of Interest: Dr. Gosch is a nationally recognized expert on clinical child psychology and anxiety disorders.  She has published on several topics, but is best known for co-editing Comparative Treatments for Anxiety Disorders and articles on the treatment of internalizing disorders in children.  Dr. Gosch is currently on the editorial board of Clinical Psychology: Science and Practice.  She serves as a reviewer for Cognitive and Behavioral Practice, the Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, and the Behavior Therapist.  She has served on the Publications Committee of the Association for Advancement of Behavior Therapy.  She was a co-principal investigator of an NIMH-funded study (NIMH-64484-01A1; five-year award beginning 2002) of therapeutic process and alliance in the treatment of children with anxiety disorders. 

Dr. Gosch's major research interest concerns the process and effectiveness of psychotherapy with differing populations. Much of her work has focused on the treatment of anxiety and depression in youth. She has conducted NIMH-funded psychotherapy outcome research at the University of Pennsylvania's Center for Psychotherapy Research, the Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, and the Child and Adolescent Anxiety Disorders Clinic at Temple University. Her past work at the Behavioral Therapy Service of the Institute of Pennsylvania Hospital and the Princeton Child Development Institute has also provided her with extensive experience in the field of cognitive-behavioral assessment and treatment.

STACEY CAHN, PH.D.
Assistant Professor
Areas of Interest: Dr. Cahn's area of expertise is broadly clinical health psychology, including eating disorders, sleep, depression in heart disease, and aging.  Dr. Cahn has extensive clinical training in eating disorders including binge eating disorder and severe bulimia and anorexia nervosa throughout the continuum of care, from outpatient to inpatient treatment.  Dr. Cahn is a licensed clinical psychologist and a member of the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies.  Dr. Cahn has co-authored numerous articles and presentations and has served as an ad-hoc reviewer for the Journal of Behavioral Sleep Medicine.

Dr. Cahn's areas of research interest are in clinical health psychology, including eating disorders, as well as the areas of sleep, depression in heart disease, and aging.  Dr. Cahn has extensive training in eating disorders and served as a research clinician on the largest treatment outcome study to date on binge eating disorder, working under the supervision of G. Terence Wilson.  She has an affiliate medical staff appointment at the University Medical Center of Princeton, Department of Psychiatry where she has treated anorexia and bulimia nervosa throughout the continuum of care, from outpatient to inpatient treatment.

RORI MINNISALE, PSY.D.
Areas of Interest: Psychological testing; school psychology, assessment of learning disorders and ADHD; parent support for learning disordered children and adolescents. 

SUSAN PANICHELLI-MINDEL, PH.D.
Clinical Assistant Professor
Areas of Interest: Dr. Mindel’s research interests include issues in clinical child psychology, with an emphasis on the prevention and treatment of anxiety disorders, and diagnostic differences and treatment of subtypes of ADHD.  Furthermore, her interests branch out to broader areas including child psychopathology as related to parenting variables, comorbidity, social behavior patterns, coping, and treatment responsiveness.  She has served as an ad-hoc reviewer for the Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, Cognitive Therapy and Research, and as Notes and Announcements editor for Cognitive Therapy and Research.

BRAD ROSENFIELD, PSY.D.
Assistant Professor
Areas of Interest:  Dr. Rosenfield's clinical experience includes post-doctoral training at the University of Pennsylvania's Center for Cognitive Therapy and the Adult ADHD Treatment and Research Program, in the Department of Psychiatry.  He has maintained a private practice in treating a diverse client population with disorders ranging from social and occupational impairment to personality disorders and substance abuse. Dr. Rosenfield also has an intense interest in human-animal interactions and modifying behavior to the benefit of all concerned. Dr. Rosenfield has been active in the field of cognitive therapy and behavior modification as a teacher, researcher, writer, and clinician.  He is an assistant professor and practicum coordinator in the Clinical PsyD program at PCOM.  Dr. Rosenfield has published several articles in refereed journals and book chapters and has served as a coeditor and biographical editor of the International Encyclopedia of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy.  He has also presented numerous invited lectures and workshops both within the United States and abroad.

Dr. Rosenfield's current research interests include cognitive behavioral therapy for adult ADHD, depressive disorders, somatic disorders, anxiety disorders, single session treatment for panic attacks, the social psychology of terrorism, multicultural counseling, communication skills, treating difficult patients, and human-animal interactions.

MARSHA SINGER, PH.D.
Clinical Assistant Professor
Areas of Interest:  Prior to joining PCOM’s faculty, Dr. Singer worked for 13 years at Virtua Memorial Hospital Burlington County where she was a member of the Psychiatry Department and Associate Director of the Family Practice Residency Program.  Dr. Singer’s main professional interest is clinical health psychology.  She is very interested in the role of cultural, spiritual and other psychosocial factors in health behavior and patient attitudes.  She is also interested in the role of family members as social supports in medical and mental health settings.

BEVERLY WHITE, PSY.D.
Clinical Assistant Professor
Areas of Interest:  In addition to her PCOM responsibilities as clinical assistant professor of psychology, Dr. White works as a clinical consultant to one of the largest community health care providers in the country and has been in private practice for several years.  Dr. White's private practice has focused on working with sexually abused children, adolescents and their families.  Additionally, she has conducted numerous sexual abuse evaluations for the Philadelphia County Department of Human Services.  Dr. White has presented at professional conferences and has traveled internationally to lead several workshops and trainings on various topics. Dr. White's other mentoring and research interests include projective assessment methods, cross-cultural assessment, the functions of the right and left brain hemispheres, and trauma.  Her pursuant concentration on social psychology, cultural and individual diversity and spirituality and mental health continue to be areas of strong interest as well.

DEBORAH CHIUMENTO, PSY.D.
Post-Doctoral Fellow
Areas of Interest:  Clinical health psychology, consultation with family medicine. 

SOONI LEE, PSY.D.
Post-Doctoral Fellow
Areas of Interest:  Clinical health psychology, consultation with family medicine. 

 

References

Beutler, L. E.  & Groth-Marnat, G. (Eds.) (2003).  Integrative assessment of adult personality, 2nd Edition.  New York: Guilford Press.

DiTomasso, R.A., Golden, B.A., and Morris, H., Eds. (2010). Handbook of cognitive behavioral approaches in primary care.  New York: Springer.

Falender, C. A., Cornish, J. E., Goodyear, R., Hatcher, R., Kaslow, N., Leventhal, N., Shafranske, E., Sigmon, S., Stoltenberg, C., and Grus, C. (2004).  Defining competencies in psychology supervision: A consensus statement.  Journal of Clinical Psychology, 60(7), 771-785.

Freeman, A., Felgoise, S. H., & Davis, D. D. (2008).  Clinical Psychology: Integrating Science and Practice, pp. 421-444. John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

James, L. C. & Folen, R. A. (2005).  The primary care consultant: The next frontier for psychologists in hospitals and clinics. American Psychological Association.  ISBN: 1-59147-212-1

Hanson, S. L., Kerkhoff, T. R., and Bush, S.S. (2004).   Health Care Ethics for Psychologists: A Casebook.  APA. ISBN#: 1-59147-152-4.

Needleman, L. (1999).  Cognitive Case Conceptualization: A Guide for Practitioners.  Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc. ISBN-13: 9780805819083

Norcross, J. C.  (2002). Psychotherapy relationships that work. Therapists’ contributions and responsiveness to patients.  Oxford:  Oxford University.

Robinson, P. J., and Strosahl, K. D. (2009).  Behavioral health consultation and primary care: Lessons learned. J. Clin. Psychol Med Settings (16), 58-71

Stirman, S. W., Bhar, S., Spokas, M., Brown, G. K., Creed, T., Perivoliotis, D., Farabaugh, D., Grant, P., & Beck, A.T. (2010).  Training and consultation in evidence-based psychosocial treatments in public mental health settings: The ACCESS Model. Professional Psychology: Research and Practice, 41(1), 48-56.