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2014 Annual Diversity Conference
 
  

Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine Department of Psychology
&
Culturally Aware Psychology Students (CAPS)

Present:

"From Exclusion to Inclusion”
5th Annual Diversity Conference

Friday, April 4, 2014 from 6-8pm
&
Saturday, April 5, 2014 from 9am-3pm

 

 

Free and open to all students, faculty, professionals, and the general public with registration.

CEU Credit: Earn up to 6.5 CEs for Psychologists, Social Workers, School Psychologists (NASP), and NBCC Counselors.

 For more information: Contact Dr. Yuma I. Tomes at yumato@pcom.edu or 215-871-6946

  Tweet us live!  #pcomdiversity2014

 

 

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Conference Schedule

Friday, April 4th

Registration: 5:30 - 6:00 PM
Evans Hall Lobby

Keynote Address: 6:00 – 8:00 PM
Unraveling the Knot of Privilege and Oppression
Allan G. Johnson, Ph.D.
Evans Hall, Zedeck Amphitheater

 

Saturday, April 5th

Registration & Breakfast: 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM
Evans Hall Lobby

Opening Plenary: 9:00 - 10:30 AM
Addressing Differences and Diversity
Shalonda Kelly, Ph.D.
Evans Hall, Zedeck Amphitheater

Presentations (select one): 10:45 AM - 12:15 PM
Being on the Other Side of the Desk From (or as) a Sexual Minority Group Member
Nadine Rosechild Sullivan, PhD
Evans Hall, Zedeck Amphitheater
     or
Perceived Family Perfectionism and Perfectionism in Asians
Bindu Methikalam, Ph.D.
Evans Hall, Ginsburg Amphitheater

Closing Session: 1:30 PM - 3:00 PM
Pluralistic Leadership: Principles and Promising Practices
Thomas A. Gordon, Ph.D. and Maya K. Gordon, Ph.D.
Evans Hall, Zedeck Amphitheater

 

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Unraveling the Knot of Privilege and Oppression
Allan G. Johnson, Ph.D.
Friday, April 4th, 6:00 – 8:00 PM

One of the greatest barriers to ending racism and other forms of privilege is that we are trapped in cultural ways of thinking.  These things turn conversations about privilege and oppression into occasions for members of dominant groups to feel guilt and become defensive. As a result, the conversations we need to have either happen badly or, more often, don't happen at all. This presentation is designed to help participants to overcome that barrier by providing alternative ways of thinking about difficult issues of privilege. Dr. Johnson's books, The Gender Knot (revised edition, 2005) and Privilege, Power, and Difference (2nd edition, 2005) will be used as a basis for describing these important issues.  The presenter will use the clinical and empirical literature as well as practice knowledge in this area to inform guidelines for Best Practices.   

Educational Objectives:
Based on the presentation, the participants will be able to:

I. Describe issues of racism and privilege.
II. Discuss thoughts and ways of thinking that negatively impact discussion of privilege and oppression.
III. Describe some new and alternative ways of thinking about privilege and oppression that will foster effective discussion of these matters.

Target Audience: Doctoral Level Psychologists and Other Mental Health Practitioners
Level of Instruction: Basic
Number of CE Credits Offered: 2.0
Cost: Free

About the Speaker:
Dr. Allan G. Johnson is a nationally recognized sociologist, nonfiction author, novelist, and public speaker and is best known for his work on issues of privilege and oppression, especially in relation to gender and race. He received his B.A. from Dartmouth College and his Ph.D. in Sociology from the University of Michigan.  He has been a visiting lecturer at Dartmouth and a Visiting Lecturer at Harvard University.  He also served as Professor of Sociology and Woman’s Studies at Hartford College.  He has spoken at more than 200 universities, colleges, corporations, and other organizations. He is the author of numerous books, including The Gender Knot: Unraveling Our Patriarchal Legacy and Privilege, Power, and Difference. His nonfiction books have been translated into several languages and excerpted in numerous anthologies. His novel, The First Thing and the Last, after meeting with considerable resistance from mainstream publishers because of its realistic portrayal of domestic violence, was named a notable debut work of fiction by Publisher’s Weekly and a “Great Read” by O Magazine. His second novel, Nothing Left to Lose, is the story of an American family in crisis during the Vietnam War.

 

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Addressing Differences and Diversity
Shalonda Kelly, Ph.D.
Saturday, April 5th, 9:00 - 10:30 AM

This workshop will provide a sense of the common ways and reasons that clinicians may experience a “disconnect” with their clients based on diversity-related differences. Participants  will learn how to consider universal/dominant and specific/local views of what is normal and abnormal and learn a framework with broad examples for addressing those differences, toward considering both “treatment as usual” and appropriate alternate diversity-related hypotheses in addressing differences. In particular, attendees will be exposed to examples of the key cultural competence factors of knowledge, skills, awareness, and dynamic sizing, with vignettes derived from real cases, so that service providers can experience better understanding of and rapport with their clients, and be exposed to skills that can increase their ability to provide strengths-based assistance to their clients.  The presenter will use the clinical and empirical literature as well as practice knowledge in this area to inform guidelines for Best Practices.

Educational Objectives:
Based on the Presentation, the participants will be able to:

I. Describe at least three reasons why issues arise in cross-cultural interactions
II. Describe examples of universal/dominant and specific/local views of what is normal and abnormal
III. Describe examples of the key cultural competence factors of knowledge, skills, awareness, and dynamic sizing
IV. Describe the steps in applying diversity concepts to cases

 Target Audience: Doctoral Level Psychologists and Other Mental Health Practitioners
Level of Instruction: Basic
Number of CE Credits Offered: 1.5
Cost: Free

About the Speaker:
Dr. Shalonda Kelly is an Associate Professor in the clinical psychology department of the Graduate School of Applied and Professional Psychology at Rutgers University. She received her BA from Pomona College in psychology and her MA and Ph.D. from Michigan State University in clinical psychology – urban studies. Dr. Kelly publishes empirical and clinical work related to racial, ethnic and cultural issues, and couples relationships. She has received NIH and Rutgers University funding to study racial and cultural factors in clinic-referred and university populations. She also has consulted with colleagues and conducted workshops with organizations toward better understanding the needs of African American and other ethnic minority clients. She is a New Jersey licensed psychologist who conducts and supervises couples and family therapy from a cognitive-behavioral and systems theoretical orientation. She has had extensive experience in conducting outpatient, residential, emergency, and inpatient therapy with children, couples, families, and adults, predominantly of ethnic minority and other diverse backgrounds. She teaches courses on couple’s therapy and diversity and supervises graduate student clinicians.

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Being on the Other Side of the Desk From (or as) a Sexual Minority Group Member
Nadine Rosechild Sullivan, PhD
Saturday, April 5th, 10:45 AM - 12:15 PM

Do you seek to understand your patient (and yourself) holistically – as full human beings? Every patient deserves our best and most professional treatment; every clinician deserves the opportunity to practice from her/his own best self. The likelihood and expectations of sexual minority group members for such treatment and opportunities range widely, are often age- or culture-related, and strongly influence the willingness to be open about our identities in the clinical setting. On either side of the desk – as patient or practitioner – sex, gender identity, and sexual orientation, are often the unaddressed elephant(s) in the room, complicating medical treatment and the patient/practitioner relationship. Intolerance is increasingly socially unacceptable and often springs from a lack of understanding. Yet, for either patient or practitioner, tolerance alone is not enough. Tolerance does not equal acceptance. Further still, a grudging acceptance falls far from approval – far from the compassionate warmth of a good ‘bedside manner’ that allows for a true, therapeutic, clinical interaction and a complete understanding of the complex mosaic of sex, gender, and orientation – in yourself and in your patients.  The presenter will use the clinical and empirical literature as well as practice knowledge in this area to inform guidelines for Best Practices.   

Educational Objectives:
Based on the presentation, the participants will be able to:

I. Discuss the differences between sex, gender identity, presentation of the mind, and affectional/sexual orientation.
II. Describe strategies to allow patients (or, when called for, they themselves) to disclose personal information about their sex/gender/orientation in the clinical setting for a therapeutic purpose.
III. Discuss ways in which sex/gender/orientation are viewed differently within different age-groups, ethnicities, and cultures, that further complicates disclosure. 

Target Audience: Doctoral Level Psychologists and Other Mental Health Practitioners
Level of Instruction: Basic
Number of CE Credits Offered: 1.5
Cost: Free

About the Speaker:
Nadine Rosechild Sullivan, Ph.D. is a lecturer, book author, and ordained minister.  She earned her M.A. and Ph.D in Sociology from Temple University with concentrations in Women’s Studies, Gender, Sexuality, Racial and Ethnic Identity.  Since 2004 Dr. Sullivan has taught as Temple University, Rowan University and Ursinus College.  Throughout her career she has been the recipient of many honors, distinctions and scholarships.  She maintains a counseling practice in Chestnut Hill, PA. and is a faculty member of the Sociology, Women’s Studies, and LGBT Studies Departments at Temple and Rowan Universities, where she teaches courses on diversity. She is the author of, “I Trusted You: Fully and Honestly Speaking of Gendered Assault” as well as “The Real Gay Agenda: What Gay (Bi & Trans) People Want – and Why.”

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Perceived Family Perfectionism and Perfectionism in Asians
Bindu Methikalam, Ph.D.
Saturday, April 5th, 10:45 AM - 12:15 PM

As the number of immigrants coming to the United States grows, mental health professionals are faced with the responsibility of addressing their needs (Rogler, Malgady & Rodriguez, 1989). Although addressing the needs of ethnic minorities is a challenge that mental health professionals continue to face, (Sue, Ivey & Pederson, 1996), little research has focused on the concerns of ethnic minorities and a smaller amount of research has focused on the needs of Asians.  The importance placed on the family and expectations for high achievement are common aspects of the Asian culture (Inman, Ladany, Constantine & Morano, 1999).  Asian parents tend to emphasize obedience with parental expectations but self-assertion for the academic success of their children (Rhee, 1996). Cross-cultural studies on perfectionism indicate that Asians have a higher number of maladaptive perfectionists than other ethnic minority groups.   Moreover, Castro and Rice (2003) state that Asian American college students may feel pressure to meet parental expectations for success.  Asian students experience considerable pressure from themselves and their families to perform at high levels and this pressure can lead to psychological distress.  Thus for Asians, it seems relevant to understand the construct of perfectionism not only from the individual perspective but also regarding influences from the family.    The presenters will use the clinical and empirical literature as well as practice knowledge in this area to inform guidelines for Best Practices.   

Educational Objectives:
Based on this presentation the participants will be able to:

I. Describe the impact that perfectionism has on an individual’s mental health
II. Discuss the relevance of perfectionism in the Asian population
III. Describe the relationship between perceived family expectations and perfectionism in Asians

Target Audience: Doctoral Level Psychologists and Other Mental Health Practitioners
Level of Instruction: Intermediate
Number of CE Credits Offered: 1.5
Cost: Free

About the Speaker:
Bindu Methikalam, Ph.D. is Assistant Professor of Psychology and the Assistant Director of Clinical Training at Chestnut Hill College, Philadelphia.  Dr. Methikalam completed her doctorate in Counseling Psychology at The Pennsylvania State University in 2008. She has worked with undergraduate and graduate students for over five years doing individual, couples, and group therapy. She completed her internship at the Counseling Center at Penn State University and post-doctoral residency in college student mental health with a specialization in alcohol and drug counseling at Princeton University’s Counseling and Psychological Services. Her dissertation focused on family expectations and perfection in the Asian Indian populations. Dr. Methikalam’s research interests are in perfectionism, family expectations, multicultural issues and South Asian concerns, particularly, immigrant experiences, acculturation, cultural identities, and the psychology of women.  She has presented her work at several conferences nationally and has led workshops and created programs at local universities including Villanova, Penn State, and Princeton.  

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Pluralistic Leadership: Principles and Promising Practices
Thomas A. Gordon, Ph.D. and Maya K. Gordon, Ph.D.
Saturday, April 5th, 1:30 PM - 3:00 PM

This leadership excellence session will explore the power and productive potential of diversity –led, aligned, integrated, and reinforced strategies –for personal, partnership, and institutional success. It defines pluralistic leadership (PL) as a healthy inclusion essential, and offers high value strategies and tactics for challenging meritless exclusions, structural divisiveness and inequities, partnering dysfunctions, mass media-scripted distortions, and crippling collusion  This presentation builds rapid capacity and comfort to harvest diversity’s problem-solving and positive energy potential. It challenges inclusion charades, cosmetics, tourism, and inertia. It prepares the audience to lead PL change –to promote credible, merit-centric selection and utilization of significant, visible and subtle diversity throughout all institutional levels, arenas, and endeavors.  The presenters will use the clinical and empirical literature as well as practice knowledge in this area to inform guidelines for Best Practices.

Educational Objectives:
Based on the presentation, participants will be able to:

I. Define diversity, inclusion, collusion, and pluralistic leadership (PL) and important key indicators
II. Describe systemic-, collective-, mass media-, and self-mastery PL challenges as well as PL change impediments and opportunities 
III. Discuss PL best practice models, action accountabilities, impact metrics, and reinforcements
IV. Discuss PL systemic and self-mastery principles to promote and sustain more robust inclusion

Target Audience: Doctoral Level Psychologists and Other Mental Health Practitioners
Level of Instruction: Basic
Number of CE Credits Offered: 1.5
Cost: Free

About the Speakers:
A licensed psychologist, Dr. Gordon graduated cum laude from Harvard University; earned his M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Michigan; and completed post-doctoral mass media, group dynamics, and conflict resolution study at the University of Pennsylvania/Annenberg School of Communications. 

Dr. Gordon’s career spans 35+ years – as college professor, health and mental health systems manager, psychotherapist, leadership coach, and organizational advisor. His faculty affiliations have included: University of Michigan, Temple University, University of Pennsylvania, Antioch College, Goddard College, Department of Psychiatry/Thomas Jefferson University, Family Medicine/Medical University of South Carolina, and the Federal Executive Institute. He serves on the Health Promotion Council’s Board of Directors.
 
Dr. Maya Gordon is a specialist in self-concept, identity formation, women’s health/empowerment, and mass media.  She is a developmental psychologist, former Temple University and St. Joseph’s University faculty, and Cabrini College Assistant Professor. Dr. Gordon graduated from Spelman College magna cum laude and holds M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Michigan. She completed Wellesley College post-doctoral mass media and women’s identity research. Dr. Gordon is married and the mother of 4 children.    

 

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Criteria for Earning CE
For those attending, you must sign into each session, attend each session in its entirety and complete and submit the evaluation form at the conclusion of each session to be awarded Continuing Education credits. Partial credits are not available.

PSYCHOLOGISTS: 1.5 CE hours/credits per event (except for Dr. Johnson’s presentation for which 2.0 CE hours/credits are available).  The Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine (PCOM) Department of Psychology is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists.  PCOM Department of Psychology maintains responsibility for this program and its content.  

NBCC COUNSELORS:  1.5 CE hours/credits per event (except for Dr. Johnson’s presentation for which 2.0 CE hours/credits are available).  The Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine (PCOM) Department of Psychology is an NBCC-Approved Continuing Education Provider (ACEP) and may offer NBCC-approved clock hours for events that meet NBCC requirements.  The ACEP solely is responsible for all aspects of the program.  Provider Number: 5672.

LICENSED SOCIAL WORKERS: 1.5 CE hours/credits per event (except for Dr. Johnson’s presentation for which 2.0 CE hours/credits are available).  The Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine (PCOM) Department of Psychology is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists.  The PCOM Department of Psychology maintains responsibility for this program and its content.  The Pennsylvania Board of Social Work Examiners recognizes and accepts the psychology continuing education hours/credits for social workers.  Social workers who meet the CE criteria will receive the Certificate of Attendance.   

Registration
Advance registration is requested.  To register, please call PCOM Department of Psychology at 215-871-6442.

Parking
PCOM has a parking garage that can be entered from the PCOM driveway off Monument Road, from Stout Road, or from City Avenue.  Cost: $5.00  
 
Suggested Readings
A list of suggested readings will be provided by the presenters.  
 
 

Director of Continuing Education
Robert A. DiTomasso, Ph.D., ABPP

Associate Director of Continuing Education
Bruce S. Zahn, Ed.D., ABPP

Continuing Education Student Advisory Committee
Christina Haldaman, Kaycee Beglau, Deborah Klawiter, Angelo Rannazzisi,
John Michael Della Porta

Coordinator of Continuing Education
Rachel J. Cuffeld-Gaymon, MBA

 

Unless otherwise specified in the program promotional materials, there is no commercial support interest to the sponsor, instructors, content of instruction or any other relationship that could be construed as a conflict of interest.  Unless otherwise noted in the promotional materials, all PCOM Department of Psychology CE programs are free of charge. For any program for which a fee is charged, there is a Refund/Cancellation Policy.

Refund/Cancellation Policy: For any program that has a fee attached, the Department of Psychology requires that notification of cancellation be made no later than 3 business days before the day of the program. Full refunds are available for notifications for programs with fees that are made within 3 business days prior to the day of the event. For all other cancellations, a credit will be issued for a future PCOM CE program.

Further Information about the Refund/Cancellation Policy and any other questions may be obtained by contacting Rachel Cuffeld-Gaymon, MBA, Coordinator of Continuing Education at 215-871-6533 or Rachelcu@pcom.edu.

 

 



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