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2013 Annual Diversity Conference
 
  

(Past Conference)

Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine Department of Psychology
&
Culturally Aware Psychology Students (CAPS)

Present:

"Cultural Intent vs. Cultural Impact: Expanding Your Comfort Zone”
4th Annual Diversity Conference

Friday, March 15, 2013 from 6-8pm
&
Saturday, March 16, 2013 from 8:30am-4:15pm

 

 

Free and open to all students, faculty, professionals, and the general public with registration.

CEU Credit: Earn up to 6 CEs for Psychologists, Social Workers, and NBCC Counselors.

For more information: Contact Dr. Yuma I. Tomes at yumato@pcom.edu or 215-871-6946

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Conference Schedule

Keynote Speaker:

Forensic Psychology and Community Violence: What is the Health Provider’s Role
H. Jean Wright, II, PsyD
Friday, March 15, 6:00 – 8:00 PM

 

Special Presentation:

You Don’t Know Me Until You Know Me
Michael Fowlin, PsyD
Saturday, March 16, 9:00 - 10:30 AM

 

Presentations:

The New Normal: Affirming Gender and Sexual Diversity
Graciela Slesaransky-Poe, PhD
Saturday, March 16, 10:45 AM - 12:15 PM

BARNGA: The Definitive Comfort Zone Stretching Workout
Marie Amey-Taylor, EdD
Saturday, March 16, 10:45 AM - 12:15 PM

Help Inside of the Trauma Zone When You Are An Outsider
R. Dandridge Collins, PhD
Saturday, March 16, 10:45 AM - 12:15 PM

Narcissistic Behavior, Neuropsychology, & Cultural Impact
Rudolph Hall, MEd
Saturday, March 16, 1:30 PM - 2:30 PM

Forced Cultural Issues vs. Socially Acceptable Cultural Issues
JoAnne M. Craig, EdD
Saturday, March 16, 1:30 PM - 2:30 PM

A Culturally-Informed Perspective for Integrating Religion/Spirituality in Psychosocial Treatments with African Americans
Tommy Davis, PhD
Saturday, March 16, 1:30 PM - 2:30 PM

 

Closing Presentation:

Changing Attitudes Towards People with Disabilities
Jyh-Hann Chang, PhD
Saturday, March 16, 2:45 PM - 4:15 PM

 

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Forensic Psychology and Community Violence: What is the Health Provider’s Role
H. Jean Wright, II, PsyD
Friday, March 15, 6:00 – 8:00 PM

About the Speaker:
Dr. H. Jean Wright, II, currently Senior Advisor and Criminal Justice Coordinator, Forensic Services, for the Philadelphia Department of Behavioral Health and Intellectual Disability Services, received his professional training in the specialty areas of clinical and forensic psychology.  He earned his PsyD from Wright State School of Professional Psychology and is a licensed psychologist in PA.  His interests and specialties include human behavior across the lifespan; group dynamics; children and youth issues; minorities and mental health; cross-system collaboration(s) between behavioral health agencies and the justice system; the Juvenile Justice System; the Adult Criminal Justice System, justice-involved persons in recovery (PIR) with severe mental health challenges and co-occurring disorders; substance use/dependence; and the dynamics of psychosocial relationships. Most of Dr. Wright’s experience in these areas emerges from his work in private practice, government relations, administration, university teaching, rehabilitation/correctional settings, and community mental health work.  Dr. Wright is an Adjunct Professor, Department of Psychology, Temple University.  Dr. Wright has published in the areas of racial and ethnic disparities and competent practice with African-American adolescent males.  Over the course of his career, he has conducted about 70 workshops and seminars.

Given the recent tragedies experienced across the landscape of the United States, many Americans have questioned the appropriate response regarding the mental health needs of so many.   As perspectives change regarding aggressive behaviors towards others, in particular children, it is important that communities become more supportive about addressing these challenges through forensic science.  Forensic psychology is not well understood outside of the court system, academia, or mental health settings. This presentation will provide a foundation for understanding the broad definition of forensic psychology and briefly highlight specific examples of what forensic psychology "looks like" in action and how this particular discipline impacts our community.  The presenter will draw upon empirical research in forensic psychology and practice knowledge to inform the presentation regarding the prevention and treatment of community violence.   

Educational Objectives
Based on the presentation, the participants will be able to:

I. Define forensic psychology in terms of community violence and development
II. Describe the basic cognitive and behavioral factors leading to community violence
III. Describe how to recognize the dynamics of relational aggressive behaviors in children and adults
IV. Discuss suggestions for prevention and intervention in the home and community environment

Target Audience: Doctoral Level Psychologists, Mental Health & Health Professionals, Social Workers, and Counselors

Level of Instruction: Intermediate

CEU: 2.0

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You Don’t Know Me Until You Know Me
Michael Fowlin, PsyD
Saturday, March 16, 9:00 - 10:30 AM

About the Speaker:
Dr. Fowlin has been formally acting since age 11.  In addition to his talents on stage, he earned an undergraduate degree in psychology from Evangel University in Springfield, MO and in the fall of 2001, he obtained his doctoral degree from Rutgers University.

In this professional presentation Dr. Fowlin will combine both his professional acting talents and his psychological training to create an atmosphere of worldwide inclusion, not just tolerance, towards all people. He has worked extensively with all age groups in the United States and in other countries. His work has included peer mediation, diversity trainings, gender equity workshops, and violence prevention seminars.  He hopes that all audience members will leave his presentation with the celebration of our differences and the acceptance of our shared experiences.  Dr. Fowlin will provide participants with ways for celebrating diversity, strategies for applying gender theory for fostering shared experiences, and ways for understanding and dealing with microaggressions.  He will use psychological theory, empirical research and practice knowledge to inform his presentation.

Educational Objectives
Based on the Presentation, the participants will be able to:

I. List and describe new ways to celebrate diversity
II. Describe gender theory as a means to  demonstrate acceptance for shared experiences with culturally diverse populations
III. Discuss theories of microaggression and how to address issues with aggressive individuals
 
Target Audience: Doctoral Level Psychologists, Mental Health & Health Professionals, Social Workers, and Counselors

Level of Instruction: Beginning

CEU: Note: No Psychology CEU credits are being offered for this presentation.

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The New Normal: Affirming Gender and Sexual Diversity
Graciela Slesaransky-Poe, PhD
Saturday, March 16, 10:45 AM - 12:15 PM

About the Speaker:
Dr. Graciela Slesaransky-Poe is an Associate Professor of Special Education in the Education Department at Arcadia University, where she coordinates the Special Education master's and certification programs. She is an educational consultant, an author, a motivational speaker, and a leader in inclusive education practices. Dr. Slesaransky-Poe is dedicated to supporting educators in developing the beliefs, attitudes, knowledge, and skills needed to transform their schools into places where everyone feels valued and included.  Dr. Slesaransky-Poe received her PhD in special education from Temple University. She has an extensive history of working with, and advocating for, enhancing the independence, productivity, inclusion and self-determination of people with disability, both here in the United States and in Argentina, her country of origin. Her scholarship, teaching, and service work include both inclusion and social justice; more specifically, inclusive education; family collaboration; racial profiling of students of color in education; and, supporting students, families, and educators of diverse gender identity and sexual orientation. She is a consultant to various local school districts, state Department of Education and the and US Department of Education, and is an active Board Member in several parent and professional organizations, including Welcoming Schools, a program of the Human Rights Campaign (HRC), and the Pennsylvania Education for All Coalition.

As the landscape of the United States becomes even more diverse over time, families raising children are significantly impacting communities and schools.  Many GLBTQ families enjoy same-gender loving communities and wonderful partnerships with their children’s school, where they feel welcomed, visible, affirmed, and valued. However, this is not always the case.  Some GLBTQ parents encounter prejudicial beliefs and stark criticism by teachers, administrators, and community leaders.  In this presentation, steps to approach and collaborate with communities and schools to create a respectful and inclusive environment for all families will be discussed.  The participants will learn the characteristics that differentiate “welcoming” from “unwelcoming” environments.   Approaches for fostering effective collaboration with schools and communities will be discussed.  The presenter will draw upon Social Justice Theory, research and practice knowledge in this area to inform her presentation.

Educational Objectives
Based on the presentation, the participants will be able to:

I. List steps to create safe and inclusive schools for GLBTQ parents and students
II. Discuss the top three approaches for collaborating with schools and communities based on Social Justice Theory
III. Discuss GLBTQ issues and prepare affirming statements for community development
IV. Describe the differences between “welcoming” and “unwelcoming” environments

Target Audience: Doctoral Level Psychologists, Mental Health & Health Professionals, Social Workers, and Counselors

Level of Instruction: Intermediate

CEU: 1.5

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BARNGA: The Definitive Comfort Zone Stretching Workout
Marie Amey-Taylor, EdD
Saturday, March 16, 10:45 AM - 12:15 PM

About the Speaker:
Dr. Marie Amey-Taylor is Assistant Vice President, Human Resources, Learning & Development Division and Adjunct Associate Professor, Adult and Organizational Development Program, Department of Psychological, Organizational and Leadership Studies, College of Education, Temple University.  Dr. Amey-Taylor has a rich and varied career history that includes a variety of professional experiences.  She has assumed many roles including that of educator; program administrator; internal/external training and organizational development consultant; group facilitator; executive coach; theater troupe founder;  artistic director, and, public speaker.  She holds a doctoral degree in Psycho-Educational Processes/Adult and Organizational Development and a master’s degree in Urban Education and Policy Studies, College of Education, Temple University.  She is the Founder and Director of InterACTion Improvisational Theatre Group and has held positions as a Director of Human Resources-Organizational Development and Senior Training.  Her scholarly works focus on appreciating diversity, building  across differences and resolving diversity issues.  She has conducted over 40 professional presentations in this area.

In this highly experiential skill-building session, Goleman’s Emotional Intelligence Model will be described and used as a theoretical framework for exploring the process of stretching one's cultural and diversity comfort zones.  Dr. Amey-Taylor will emphasize the importance of having a consistent focus on one's self-awareness, self-regulation, social awareness and relationship management skills.  She will draw upon theory, empirical literature, and practice knowledge to inform her presentation and to assist practitioners to realize and expand their comfort zones in working with culturally diverse populations.  She has conducted over 40 professional presentations in this area.

Educational Objectives
Based on this presentation the participants will be able to:

I. Describe Daniel Goleman’s Emotional Intelligence model
II. Apply the E-I model to an in-the-moment interactive activity
III. Describe how BARNGA can be used to expand a health practitioners’ comfort zones when working with children, parents, and patients whose diversity profiles may be both similar and different from their own

Target Audience: Doctoral Level Psychologists, Mental Health & Health Professionals, Social Workers, and Counselors

Level of Instruction: Intermediate

CEU: 1.5

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Help Inside of the Trauma Zone When You Are An Outsider
R. Dandridge Collins, PhD
Saturday, March 16, 10:45 AM - 12:15 PM

About the Speaker:
Dr. Dan Collins earned a BS in Psychology and Spanish with a minor concentration in French from Eastern College. He completed a Masters of Divinity in Pastoral Psychology at Eastern Baptist Theological Seminary. He earned his PhD in Counseling Psychology at Temple University as a Bilingualism Fellow.
Dr. Collins is a health care professional/licensed PA psychologist with over 27 years of behavioral health experience in diverse settings with premier hospitals, and residential care and community mental health facilities. He is currently the proprietor of the Pastoral Counseling Network, a pastoral psychology practice located in center city Philadelphia and Media, Pennsylvania. His practice specializes in marriage and family therapy, as well as supporting pastors in the counseling of their members throughout the Delaware Valley region. He has developed, implemented and supervised several programs that are recognized locally and nationally as being exemplary. He has a broad background in program development and service delivery, cross-cultural and multilingual counseling, clinical training and supervision, as well as educational consultation. He is the author of The Trauma Zone.

Survivors of traumatic events often feel trapped.  Unable to carry on with normal life activities, their emotional pain keeps them locked in the past. One challenging problem concerns bystanders of the trauma who are unsure about how to effectively support the lives of those affected. This presentation will offer useful steps for helping professionals who are working with traumatized individuals. Through secular and non-secular approaches, the participants will be exposed to a variety of techniques and strategies designed to address traumatic situations and facilitate a pathway to healing.  Dr. Collins will draw from empirical literature in this area as well as his extensive practice knowledge to inform this presentation.

Educational Objectives
Based on the presentation, participants will be able to:

I. Describe trauma based on negative messages learned through past experiences and reiterated by society
II. Describe road maps for processing and exiting traumatic events
III. Describe coping strategies for helping clients to feel less overwhelmed, achieve emotional regulation, and address flashback experiences
IV. List several self-help resources that may be shared with clients and practitioners

Target Audience: Doctoral Level Psychologists, Mental Health & Health Professionals, Social Workers, and Counselors

Level of Instruction: Intermediate

CEU: 1.5

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Narcissistic Behavior, Neuropsychology, & Cultural Impact
Rudolph Hall, MEd
Saturday, March 16, 1:30 PM - 2:30 PM

About the Speaker:
Mr. Hall received his Bachelor of Social Sciences in Public Policy and Special Education in 1984 and his Master of Education in Special Education in 1984. In Pennsylvania he also taught the severely mentally and physically handicapped in several schools in the Philadelphia School District.  His responsibilities included teaching Life Skills Support to a special education population made up of students with severe mental and physical disorders by using Data Driven Instruction.  Mr. Hall also served as an onsite group facilitator for the Penn Literacy Network, University of Pennsylvania Graduate School of Education where the initiative is centered on IDEA 2004.  This initiative encouraged the education of special needs students within the least restrictive environment. After retirement Mr. Hall began teaching psychology and proceeded to study Narcissistic behavior.

In 2009 he became the recipient of the Delaware County Community College Educational Foundation, Part-time Faculty Award. As an adjunct professor teaching primarily in the field of Psychology, he wrote Narcissistic Behavior in the Post Modern Era: The Study of Neuropsychology, by using the Biopsychosocial approach to understanding personality disorders.

In this presentation Mr. Hall will demonstrate how the media, in his view, has become an enabler by changing what we once considered “normal behavior,” and associating it with clinical narcissism, vanity, exhibitionism, entitlement, exploitation, self-sufficiency, authority, and superiority. Mr. Hall’s thesis is that people are personifying the narcissistic behavior that is being portrayed in the media. Normalizing narcissistic behavior in the public eye has fueled narcissistic behavior among everyday people and is evident in several contexts.   Mr. Hall will examine the neuropsychology behind narcissistic behavior.
 
Based on the presentation the participants will be able to:
1.  Discuss narcissism in the everyday behaviors of the American culture.
2.  Describe examples of how narcissistic behavior has been normalized.
3.  Discuss neuropsychology as it relates to narcissistic behavior.
4. Discuss examples of narcissistic behaviors

Target Audience:  Beginning

CEU: Note: No Psychology CEU credits are being offered for this presentation.

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Forced Cultural Issues vs. Socially Acceptable Cultural Issues
JoAnne M. Craig, EdD
Saturday, March 16, 1:30 PM - 2:30 PM

About the Speaker:
Dr. Craig is a graduate of Nova Southeastern University where she earned a Doctorate of Education in Early Childhood & Adult Education.  Presently, Dr. Craig is an Assistant Professor of Liberal Arts at Mercer County Community College and the CEO & Lead Founder for Morning Side Prep Charter School. Her interest is in the area of urban education.  Her goal is to ensure that all children receive an equal opportunity in education to succeed in their academic dreams. Dr. Craig continues to strive for equal educational opportunities for all students. She is the author of When Is It My Time to Cry.

What is the difference between “forced cultural issues” and “socially acceptable cultural issues?”  In this presentation, Dr. Craig will offer important insights that distinguish forced versus socially acceptable cultural issues.  She will also elucidate how intentional cultural actions collectively affect actions.  In order to expand one’s comfort zone it is necessary to uncover what has reinforced one’s present state. This presentation will focus on helping participants to do the following:  clearly understand intentional cultural actions; become knowledgeable about their current comfort zone; recognize what has reinforced their comfort zones; and learn how to expand their comfort zones. Finally, armed with knowledge about how to expand one’s comfort zone, strategies for taking immediate action will be discussed. Dr. Craig will use empirical literature and practice knowledge to inform her presentation.

Educational Objectives
Based on the presentation, the participants will be able to:

I. Describe the difference between forced cultural issues and socially acceptable cultural issues
II. List  intentional cultural actions that collectively impact inappropriate actions in our cultural communities
III. Discuss how to identify what one’s current conform zone is and what leads to uncomfortable feelings
IV. Describe how to expand one’s comfort zone from current function

Target Audience: Doctoral Level Psychologists, Mental Health & Health Professionals, Social Workers, and Counselors

Level of Instruction: Intermediate

CEU: 1

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A Culturally-Informed Perspective for Integrating Religion/Spirituality in Psychosocial Treatments with African Americans
Tommy Davis, PhD
Saturday, March 16, 1:30 PM - 2:30 PM

About the Speaker:
Dr. Tommy Davis, III earned his  Ph.D in Clinical Psychology from the City University of NY.  He has Master’s degrees in Clinical Psychology, General Psychology and  Applied Psychometrics.  He brings with him over 28 years of clinical experience related to individual, group, and family interventions with diverse populations. During the past 10 years, Dr. Davis has focused his professional efforts on administrative and clinical experiences in community research and community mental health. His past experiences include roles as a staff psychologist, professor, and family therapist.   He is presently the principal consultant in his own corporation, Davis Socio-Psychological Services, LLC. Dr. Davis is licensed and certified as a school psychologist in PA.  Over the past several years, he has been a frequent guest on radio shows.  His scholarly work has focused on Black families, Black fatherhood, and fostering resilience in early adolescents.  He has made over 45 professional presentations over the past several years.

In this presentation Dr. Davis discusses ways to use religion/spirituality in psychological treatment.  He will examine several empirical studies that identify positive and negative aspects of religious activities as well as techniques that use religious themes in the realm of intervention. He will offers a culturally-informed approach that may be utilized by mental health practitioners for integrating religion and spirituality into therapy.  Dr. Davis draws upon practice knowledge and empirical literature to inform his presentation.  The recipient of many honors and awards, he has been actively enrolled in many community activities.

Educational Objectives
Based on the presentation, the participants will be able to:

I. Describe two arguments for the integration of spirituality into psychotherapy practices
II. Describe one empirical orientation to the integration of spirituality/religion into psychotherapy practice
III. Discuss several studies that identify helpful and harmful aspects of religious practices with regard to behavioral health
IV. Discuss two strategies for integrating spirituality and religious concepts into psychotherapy practice along with cultural implications
 
Target Audience: Doctoral Level Psychologists, Mental Health & Health Professionals, Social Workers, and Counselors

Level of Instruction: Intermediate

CEU: 1.0

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Changing Attitudes Towards People with Disabilities
Jyh-Hann Chang, PhD
Saturday, March 16, 2:45 PM - 4:15 PM

About the Speaker:
Dr. Jyh-Hann Chang is Associate Professor of Psychology at East Stroudsburg University and a Clinical Psychologist at Pocono Medical Center. He was formerly Assistant Professor at Wright State University, School of Professional Psychology. He received his doctorate in Clinical Psychology from the University of Connecticut (Storrs) and completed his post-doctoral fellowship in Gerontology at the Department of Veteran Affairs Medical Center, Gainesville, Florida. He is Board Certified in Rehabilitation Psychology and works with the NFL, NBA, and collegiate athletes. He has presented at both national and international conferences on topics affecting attitudes toward people with disabilities.  He has been the recipient of 18 Grants and Fellowships amounting to over $800,000.

Able-bodied individuals frequently lack awareness of issues faced by Individuals with Disabilities (IWD) and as a result may feel anxious concerning how to act or what to say in interacting with individuals with a physical disability. This feeling of anxiousness may stem from the physical differences between the able bodied and IWD that leads to uncertainty about what behavior is expected and appropriate (Hastorf, Wildfogel, & Cassman, 1979; Hernandez, et al, 2008).  Able-bodied individuals also often lack knowledge regarding how to interact with people with disabilities which can fuelfeelings  of  anxiety about interacting appropriately.  This sense of uneasiness has been cited as one of the greatest contributors to negative attitudes held by able-bodied people toward IWD’s and may be a primary cause for the psychosocial barriers that IWD’s face.  These barriers may hinder the ability of IWD’s to effectively interrelate with mainstream society.  Dr. Chang  will draw from empirical literature in this area as well as practice knowledge to inform this presentation in order to create more positive interactions with IWD’s, challenge attitudes and stereotypes about this group, and promote knowledge and respect for IWD’s.
 
Educational Objectives
Based on this presentation, participants will be able to:

I. List ways on  how to promote positive interactions between IWD and able-bodied individuals
II. Discuss methods for confronting and changing  attitudes and stereotypes about working with persons with disabilities
III. Describe comfortable conversations when addressing an IWD that increases knowledge and respect.

Target Audience: Doctoral Level Psychologists, Mental Health & Health Professionals, Social Workers, and Counselors

Level of Instruction: Intermediate

CEU: 1.5

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Criteria for Earning CE
For those attending the entire two-day long program, you must sign into each session, attend each session in its entirety and complete and submit the evaluation at the conclusion of each session to be awarded a total of up to six (6) Continuing Education credits. For those unable to attend the entire two-day program, to earn Continuing Education credits for a session, each participant must sign in, attend the entire session, and submit a completed evaluation form to staff at the conclusion of the session. Partial credits for any given session are not available.

PSYCHOLOGISTS: The Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine (PCOM) Department of Psychology is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. PCOM Department of Psychology maintains responsibility for this program and its content.

NBCC COUNSELORS:  The number of contact hours varies per event; see program descriptions. The Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine (PCOM) Department of Psychology is an NBCC-Approved Continuing Education Provider (ACEP) and may offer NBCC-approved clock hours for events that meet NBCC requirements.  The ACEP solely is responsible for all aspects of the program.  Provider Number: 5672.

LICENSED SOCIAL WORKERS The Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine (PCOM) Department of Psychology is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. PCOM Department of Psychology maintains responsibility for this program and its content.
The Pennsylvania Board of Social Worker Examiners recognizes and accepts the psychology continuing education hours/credits for social workers. The board requires a minimum duration of two hours per program. Social workers will receive the Certificate of Attendance.

Director of Continuing Education
Robert A. DiTomasso, Ph.D., ABPP

Associate Director of Continuing Education
Bruce S. Zahn, Ed.D., ABPP

Continuing Education Student Advisory Committee
Christina Haldaman, Kaycee Beglau, Deborah Klawiter, Angelo Rannazzisi,
John Michael Della Porta

Coordinator for Continuing Education
Rachel J. Cuffeld-Gaymon, B.A.

 

Unless otherwise specified in the program promotional materials, there is no commercial support interest to the sponsor, instructors, content of instruction or any other relationship that could be construed as a conflict of interest.  Unless otherwise noted in the promotional materials, all PCOM Department of Psychology CE programs are free of charge.  For any program where a fee is charged, there is a Refund/Cancellation Policy.

Refund/Cancellation Policy:  For any program that has a fee attached, the Department of Psychology requires that notification of cancellation be made no later than 3 business days before the day of the program.  Full refunds are available for notifications for programs with fees that are made within 3 business days prior to the day of the event.  For all other cancellations, a credit will be issued for a future PCOM CE program. 

Further Information about the Refund/Cancellation Policy and any other questions may be obtained by contacting Rachel Cuffeld-Gaymon, B.A., Coordinator of Continuing Education at 215-871-6533 or Rachelcu@pcom.edu.

 

 



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